Entering Standing Rock Reservation
 Red Road Awareness camp
 Flag Road, Oceti Sakowin
 Lakota tribesmen enter Oceti Sakowin on horseback
 Lakota tribesmen enter Oceti Sakowin on horseback
 Lakota tribesmen enter Oceti Sakowin on horseback
 Lakota tribesmen enter Oceti Sakowin on horseback
 Dr. David Tacha, Friends of the People "I've come here because I have a tremendous love for the Native Americans and feel deeply for their plight. I've come here in support as a veteran, a citizen, and for personal reasons. As a veteran, our slogan for this meeting is 'Prayer, Peace, Forgiveness, No Violence.' and I want the whole world to know that. The veterans of America, rather than protecting with guns, are protecting with our presence and our prayers. We stand with Standing Rock."  
 Dog, a survivor of Katrina, wears a veteran's sweater
 Hecetuke Wisaca, I'm just a common man. Lakota veteran  "This isn't just about the pipeline. This is about the entire Earth. The corporations won't stop until they control every inch of it, and if we don't stop them here, they're gonna keep going. This more about 500 years of oppression and them taking, and it's time they stop. Mitakuye Oyasin. All my relations."
 Matthew Black EagleMan stands in front of his teepee encampment named Red Road Awareness
 Matthew Black EagleMan stands in front of his teepee encampment named Red Road Awareness
 Matthew Black EagleMan stands in front of his teepee encampment named Red Road Awareness
 A dog greets water protectors as they emerge from their communal sleeping tent
 Oceti Sakowin entrance reads "We Are Unarmed"
 Portrait of Lakota elder, Isadore Zephier  "When we look at anything, we try to see everything. People are waking up to the issues of life itself. The issue today, is water. That is the most important. Without water, none of us will live."
 Portrait of Lakota elder, Isadore Zephier  "Still, the treaties are the most important. They go back to the time when the white man and Lakota came together. Before that treaty was signed, all this land belonged to Lakota, my ancestors. The Creator gave it to them to take care of. We're just here for a time, but we're supposed to take care of this place. That's the responsibility the Creator gave us."
 Portrait of Lakota elder, Isadore Zephier  "They say it's an indigenous movement. That's good, because it is. But it's a time for them to learn from the indigenous movement. Then they're gonna realize that they're indigenous too, because it comes down to one thing: everybody drinks water."
 Portrait of Lakota elder, Isadore Zephier "The people have to unite as one. There's the key, in unity. It don't matter how much you know, it's how much you do and what you do, and that's what makes life what it is. If you want life to be good, then do good. 'Niya Do' I say that to everyone, 'It's up to you.'"
 Retired surgeon volunteering at Standing Rock medical center
 mic.com reporter prepares fire in communal sleeping tent
 Lakota women sell handmade jewelry near the Sacred Fire
 Flag Road, Oceti Sakowin
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